The Viceroy of Peru, Manuel de Amat y Juniet, following the instructions of the Spanish Crown, organised an expedition to settle and colonise the island in 1772, largely to prevent other powers from gaining a base in the Pacific from which to attack the coast of Peru, but also to evangelise. He sent two expeditions under the command of navigator Domingo de Bonechea, the first in 1772, aboard Aguila. Four Tahitians, Pautu, Tipitipia, Heiao and Tetuanui, accompanied Bonechea on his return voyage to Peru in 1773.[11]:236–256,325
The first Tahitians arrived from Western Polynesia in about 200 AD,[6] after a long migration from South East Asia or Indonesia, via the Fijian, Samoan and Tongan Archipelagos. This hypothesis of an emigration from Southeast Asia is supported by a number of linguistic, biological and archaeological proofs. For example, the languages of Fiji and Polynesia all belong to the same Oceanic sub-group, Fijian-Polynesian, which itself forms part of the great family of the Austronesian Languages.
In between the visits of Bougainville and Cook, in December 1768, a war of succession amongst the Tahiti's clans took place for who would assume the role of paramount chief. Tutaha's Pare-'Arue army allied with Vehiatua's Tai'arapu army, Pohuetea's Puna'auia army, To'ofa's Paea army, and Tepau-i-ahura'i (Tepau) of Fa'a'a, to defeat Amo and Purea in Papara. The warriors, women and children of Papara were massacred, while their houses, gardens, crops and livestock destroyed. Even the Mahaiatea marae was ransacked, while Amo, Purea, Tupaia and Teri'irere fled into the mountains. Vehiatua built a wall of skulls (Te-ahu-upo'o) at his Tai'arapu marae from his war trophies.[11]:134–140,144–145,196
The Mo'orea Ferry operates from Papeete and takes about 45 minutes to travel to Moorea. Other ferries are the Aremiti 5 and the Aremiti 7 and these two ferries sail to Moorea in about half an hour. There are also several ferries that transport people and goods throughout the islands. The Bora Bora cruiseline sails to Bora Bora about once a week. The main hub for these ferries is the Papeete Wharf.
During his final visit, Cook returned Ma'i to Tahiti on 12 August 1777, after Ma'i's long visit in England. Cook also brought two Maori from Queen Charlotte Sound, Te Weherua and Koa. Cook first harboured in Vaitepiha Bay, where he visited Vehiatua II's funeral bier and the prefabricated Spanish mission house. Cook also met Vehiatua III, and inscribed on the back of the Spanish cross, Georgius tertius Rex Annis 1767, 69, 73, 74 & 77, as a counterpoint to Christus Vincit Carolus III imperat 1774 on the front. On 23 August, Cook sailed for Matavai Bay, where he met Tu, his father Teu, his mother Tetupaia, his brothers Ari'ipaea and Vaetua, and his sisters Ari'ipaea-vahine, Tetua-te-ahama'i, and Auo. Cook also observed a human sacrifice, ta'ata tapu, at the 'Utu-'ai-mahurau marae, and 49 skulls from previous victims.[11]:405,419–435
Maeva, North-East of Fare, is located close to the largest of the two lagoons, called Fa’una Nui. It is famous for its farming activities. Stonefish traps – an ancestral legacy that’s still used – along with numerous marae and other archeological remnants are concentrated around this authentic village. A small educational museum was set up under a fare pōte’e (a house where the local knowledge, sacred traditions and rituals were taught) to exhibit objects and other remnants found during the various archeological digs (paddles, axe blades, fish teeth pendants, pestles, tattoo combs….). In Faie, get close to the huge blue eyed eels.
The indigenous Tahitians are of Polynesian ancestry comprising 70% of the population alongside Europeans, East Asians (mostly Chinese) and people of mixed heritage sometimes referred to as Demis. They make up the largest population in French Polynesia. Most people from metropolitan France live in Papeete and its suburbs, notably Punaauia where they make up almost 20% of the population.[citation needed]
Within the framework of this treaty, France recognised the sovereignty of the Tahitian state. The Queen was responsible for internal affairs, while France would deal with foreign relations and assure the defence of Tahiti, as well as maintain order on the island. Once the treaty had been signed there began a struggle for influence between the English Protestants and the Catholic representatives of France. During the first years of the Protectorate, the Protestants managed to retain a considerable hold over Tahitian society, thanks to their knowledge of the country and its language. George Pritchard had been away at the time. He returned however to work towards indoctrinating the locals against the Roman Catholic French.
In the 1820s, the entire population of Tahiti converted to Protestantism. Duperrey, who berthed in Tahiti in May 1823, attests to the change in Tahitian society in a letter dated 15 May 1823: "The missionaries of the Royal Society of London have totally changed the morals and customs of the inhabitants. Idolatry no longer exists among them, and they generally profess the Christian religion. The women no longer come aboard the vessel, and even when we meet them on land they are extremely reserved. (...) The bloody wars that these people used to carry out and human sacrifices have no longer taken place since 1816."[29]
Generally speaking, the natives appreciate a quiet lifestyle; but Huahine is still a very active island. The main town of Fare springs to life on Sunday mornings when the outdoor market brings truckloads of fruit and produce to the waterfront. Every year in October, the Hawaiki Nui Va'a, the largest outrigger canoe race in the South Pacific, starts from the island of Huahine. On that special day, the air is filled with excitement and intense electricity.
Huahine casts a spell over you from the moment you arrive. Only a 40-minute flight from the island of Tahiti, the enchanted Huahine, with its lush forests, untamed landscape and quaint villages, is one of Tahiti’s best-kept secrets, a place where you can live like a local. A deep, crystal-clear lagoon surrounds the two islands that comprise Huahine, while magnificent bays and white-sand beaches add drama to the experience. Relatively unchanged by the modern world, Huahine offers the slower, more tranquil pace of old Polynesia. With only eight small villages scattered across the island, the few residents welcome visitors with great kindness. Not surprisingly, this fertile world offers a rich soil providing the local farmers a bountiful harvest of vanilla, melons and bananas.
The first years proved hard work for the missionaries, despite their association with the Pōmare, the importance of whom they were aware of thanks to the reports of earlier sailors. In 1803, upon the death of Pōmare I, his son Vaira'atoa succeeded him and took the title of Pomare II. He allied himself more and more with the missionaries, and from 1803 they taught him reading and the Gospels. Furthermore, the missionaries encouraged his wish to conquer his opponents, so that they would only have to deal with a single political contact, enabling them to develop Christianity in a unified country.[9] The conversion of Pōmare II to Protestantism in 1812 marks moreover the point when Protestantism truly took off on the island.
Within the framework of this treaty, France recognised the sovereignty of the Tahitian state. The Queen was responsible for internal affairs, while France would deal with foreign relations and assure the defence of Tahiti, as well as maintain order on the island. Once the treaty had been signed there began a struggle for influence between the English Protestants and the Catholic representatives of France. During the first years of the Protectorate, the Protestants managed to retain a considerable hold over Tahitian society, thanks to their knowledge of the country and its language. George Pritchard had been away at the time. He returned however to work towards indoctrinating the locals against the Roman Catholic French.

Although various explorers had refused to get involved in tribal conflicts, the mutineers from Bounty offered their services as mercenaries and furnished arms to the family which became the Pōmare Dynasty. The chief Tū knew how to use their presence in the harbours favoured by sailors to his advantage. As a result of his alliance with the mutineers, he succeeded in considerably increasing his supremacy over the island of Tahiti.


Archaeology enthusiast or not, book a tour with Paul Atallah from Island Eco Tours and enjoy an educational and insightful discovery of Polynesia's past. Just outside Maeve Village you will find the largest stone temple with hundreds of excavated structures and many more still uncovered. In the nearby Lake Fauna Nui, visit the ancient stone fish traps considered so sacred that only descendants of the Tahitian royal family can remove them. Lastly, climb Matairea Hill and encounter remnants of countless religious and ceremonial monuments. You can also watch a feeding of the sacred blue-eyed eels in a freshwater lake near the town of Faie.
One of the smaller resorts found on the island of Bora Bora, the Oa Oa Lodge offers 3 overwater rooms in addition to 5 land based choices. Though these 3 overwater rooms are situated over the water, they are not completely found over a lagoon but rather still connected partly to the island. This means that the bungalow is half supported by land and half supported by a stilt structure. Because of this however, you'll find a lovely balcony view from each room. You'll also find a ceiling fan, a fridge and a private shower. Those who love a little in-room entertainment will delight in the flat screen TV, satellite channels and Wi-Fi.
Archaeology enthusiast or not, book a tour with Paul Atallah from Island Eco Tours and enjoy an educational and insightful discovery of Polynesia's past. Just outside Maeve Village you will find the largest stone temple with hundreds of excavated structures and many more still uncovered. In the nearby Lake Fauna Nui, visit the ancient stone fish traps considered so sacred that only descendants of the Tahitian royal family can remove them. Lastly, climb Matairea Hill and encounter remnants of countless religious and ceremonial monuments. You can also watch a feeding of the sacred blue-eyed eels in a freshwater lake near the town of Faie.

The first years proved hard work for the missionaries, despite their association with the Pōmare, the importance of whom they were aware of thanks to the reports of earlier sailors. In 1803, upon the death of Pōmare I, his son Vaira'atoa succeeded him and took the title of Pomare II. He allied himself more and more with the missionaries, and from 1803 they taught him reading and the Gospels. Furthermore, the missionaries encouraged his wish to conquer his opponents, so that they would only have to deal with a single political contact, enabling them to develop Christianity in a unified country.[9] The conversion of Pōmare II to Protestantism in 1812 marks moreover the point when Protestantism truly took off on the island.
Generally speaking, the natives appreciate a quiet lifestyle; but Huahine is still a very active island. The main town of Fare springs to life on Sunday mornings when the outdoor market brings truckloads of fruit and produce to the waterfront. Every year in October, the Hawaiki Nui Va'a, the largest outrigger canoe race in the South Pacific, starts from the island of Huahine. On that special day, the air is filled with excitement and intense electricity.
Each district or clan was organised around their marae, or stone temple. Anne Salmond quotes John Orsmond, an early missionary, as stating, "Marae were the sanctity and glory of the land, they were the pride of the people of these islands." This was especially true for the ancestral and national marae associated with the royal line. "It was the basis of royalty; It awakened the gods; It fixed the red feather girdle of the high chiefs."[11]:23,26–27

The island's economy is driven almost solely by tourism. Several resorts have been built on motu (small islands, from Tahitian) surrounding the lagoon. Hotel Bora Bora opened in 1961, and nine years later built the first over-the-water bungalows on stilts over the lagoon.[10] Today, over-water bungalows are a standard feature of most Bora Bora resorts. The quality of those bungalows ranges from comparably cheap, basic accommodations to very luxurious and expensive.


This emigration, across several hundred kilometres of ocean, was made possible by using outrigger canoes that were up to twenty or thirty meters long and could transport families as well as domestic animals. In 1769, for instance, James Cook mentions a great traditional ship (va'a) in Tahiti that was 33 m (108 ft) long, and could be propelled by sail or paddles.[7] In 2010, an expedition on a simple outrigger canoe with a sail retraced the route back from Tahiti to Asia.[8]
This emigration, across several hundred kilometres of ocean, was made possible by using outrigger canoes that were up to twenty or thirty meters long and could transport families as well as domestic animals. In 1769, for instance, James Cook mentions a great traditional ship (va'a) in Tahiti that was 33 m (108 ft) long, and could be propelled by sail or paddles.[7] In 2010, an expedition on a simple outrigger canoe with a sail retraced the route back from Tahiti to Asia.[8]
However, the island saw no combat as the American presence on Bora Bora went uncontested over the course of the war. The base was officially closed on 2 June 1946. The World War II airstrip was never able to accommodate large aircraft, but it nonetheless was French Polynesia's only international airport until Faa'a International Airport opened next to Papeete, Tahiti, in 1960.[8]

Huahine, The Garden IslandHuahine, Marae ManunuHuahine, Marae ManunuHuahine, Marae AniniHuahine's ancient fish trapsHuahine, aerial viewHuahine farmsHuahine village shopHuahine's ancient maraeHuahine's ancient fish trapsHuahineHuahine's ancient maraeLocals using Huahine's ancient fish trapsFeeding Huahine's sacred eelsHuahine, The Garden IslandHuahine, Marae Manunu
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In 1946, Tahiti and the whole of French Polynesia became an overseas territory (Territoire d'outre-mer). Tahitians were granted French citizenship, a right that had been campaigned for by nationalist leader Pouvanaa a Oopa for many years.[36] In 2003, French Polynesia's status was changed to that of an overseas collectivity (Collectivité d'outre-mer) and in 2004 it was declared an overseas country (pays d'outre-mer or POM).
Followers of 'Oro were called ariori, and each district in Tahiti had an ariori lodge led by the avae parae, black leg. These leaders had legs tattooed from thigh to heel. The first 'Oro lodge was established around 1720 by Mahi, a representative of the high priest of Taputapuatea marae and Tamatoa I, the high chief of Ra'iatea. The first 'Oro marae was established at Tautira.[11]

However, the island saw no combat as the American presence on Bora Bora went uncontested over the course of the war. The base was officially closed on 2 June 1946. The World War II airstrip was never able to accommodate large aircraft, but it nonetheless was French Polynesia's only international airport until Faa'a International Airport opened next to Papeete, Tahiti, in 1960.[8]


Archaeology enthusiast or not, book a tour with Paul Atallah from Island Eco Tours and enjoy an educational and insightful discovery of Polynesia's past. Just outside Maeve Village you will find the largest stone temple with hundreds of excavated structures and many more still uncovered. In the nearby Lake Fauna Nui, visit the ancient stone fish traps considered so sacred that only descendants of the Tahitian royal family can remove them. Lastly, climb Matairea Hill and encounter remnants of countless religious and ceremonial monuments. You can also watch a feeding of the sacred blue-eyed eels in a freshwater lake near the town of Faie.
On 2 April 1768,[19] it was the turn of Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, aboard Boudeuse and Etoile on the first French circumnavigation, to sight Tahiti. On 5 April, he anchored off Hitiaa O Te Ra, and was welcomed by its chief Reti. Bougainville was also visited by Tutaha. Bougainville only stayed about ten days on the island, which he called "Nouvelle-Cythère ", or "New Cythera (the island of Aphrodite)", because of the warm welcome he had received, the sweetness of the Tahitian customs, calling it a "sailor's Paradise." Ahutoru accompanied the French on the return voyage, becoming the first Tahitian to sail on a European vessel.[11]:93–109 The account Bougainville and Philibert Commerson gave of his port of call would contribute to the creation of the myth of a Polynesian paradise and nourished the theme of the noble savage, so dear to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which was very much in fashion.[11]:116–118 Between this date right until the end of the 18th century, the name of the island was spelled phonetically "Taïti". Beginning in the 19th century, the Tahitian orthography "Tahiti" became normal usage in French and English.[20]

The Le Méridien Bora Bora is a solid 5-star resort with almost all of its 99 rooms being overwater. The overwater bungalows are of moderate size, and nearly all of them feature a glass section of floor which lets guests observe the sea life under their room around the clock. The amenities are all modern, and the resort features a long list of water sports in addition to a full-service spa.
Around 1750, war broke out between Atehuru and Papara, forcing Te'e'eva, the daughter of the Papara chief, to flee to Raiatea. She then married Tamatoa I's eldest son, Ari'ima'o, from which their son Mau'a was born. When Borabora warriors, led by Puni, invaded Raiatea in 1763, both Mau'a and the Taputapuatea priest Tupaia, were forced to flee to Tahiti, where the new Papara chief Amo and his wife Purea gave them refuge. This led to the building of the Mahaiatea marae at Papara. However, the marriage of Amo and Purea, and their status as black leg ariori, ended with the birth of their son Teri'irere. Tupaia then became Purea's lover. Tupaia would eventually sail with Captain Cook on the Endeavor, while Mau'a would sail with Lt. Gayangos on Aguila.[11]:35–38,60–61,85,134,208,277

More than just a romantic ideal, Bora Bora is a romantic reality. It comes as no surprise that the island is an internationally acclaimed honeymoon destination. Our newlyweds who decide on a Bora Bora honeymoon often feel as though they have escaped to a private oasis tailored entirely to their special moment of marital bliss—and anyone in the midst of planning a wedding can relate to just how enticing that sounds.  
Overwater bungalows were first invented in the South Pacific (in Moorea, off Tahiti, to be specific), and this is still the premiere destination for overwater resorts. But if you aren't close to the South Pacific then you should probably also consider the Maldives. Water villas in the Maldives, as they are called there, can be found at over 80 different resorts. This string of islands just south of India has most of the world's water bungalows, and as a result they also have the most competition and the best value.
Many of us dream of spending a honeymoon or romantic retreat in an overwater bungalow, and if you've seen photos of thatched-huts on stilts overlooking a clear lagoon with striking green mountains behind them, chances are you were looking at Bora Bora in the South Pacific. After a 50-minute flight from Tahiti, you'll reach an island group featuring 10 overwater bungalow resorts.
Archaeology enthusiast or not, book a tour with Paul Atallah from Island Eco Tours and enjoy an educational and insightful discovery of Polynesia's past. Just outside Maeve Village you will find the largest stone temple with hundreds of excavated structures and many more still uncovered. In the nearby Lake Fauna Nui, visit the ancient stone fish traps considered so sacred that only descendants of the Tahitian royal family can remove them. Lastly, climb Matairea Hill and encounter remnants of countless religious and ceremonial monuments. You can also watch a feeding of the sacred blue-eyed eels in a freshwater lake near the town of Faie.

The hotel has 5 restaurants and bars, plus a long list of activities and excursions, so there will be no shortage of things to do for those who are inspired. On the other hand, its location makes it difficult to reach businesses on Bora Bora itself, so it's probably best suited to the honeymoon crowd rather than those who prefer to explore the whole island.


Mystical, captivating and alluring, Huahine is admittedly one of our favorite islands in French Polynesia. It's usually a popular choice among repeat visitors who have already seen Moorea or Bora Bora and now seek a new experience. Regardless, first timers will love the welcoming hospitality of the locals and the absolute serenity of the island's natural surroundings.
However, the island saw no combat as the American presence on Bora Bora went uncontested over the course of the war. The base was officially closed on 2 June 1946. The World War II airstrip was never able to accommodate large aircraft, but it nonetheless was French Polynesia's only international airport until Faa'a International Airport opened next to Papeete, Tahiti, in 1960.[8]
In 1877, Queen Pōmare died after ruling for fifty years. Her son, Pōmare V, then succeeded her on the throne. The new king seemed little concerned with the affairs of the kingdom, and when in 1880 the governor Henri Isidore Chessé, supported by the Tahitian chiefs, pushed him to abdicate in favour of France, he accepted. On 29 June 1880, he ceded Tahiti to France along with the islands that were its dependencies. He was given the titular position of Officer of the Orders of the Legion of Honour and Agricultural Merit of France. Having become a colony, Tahiti thus lost all sovereignty. Tahiti was nevertheless a special colony, since all the subjects of the Kingdom of Pōmare would be given French citizenship.[34] On 14 July 1881, among cries of "Vive la République!" the crowds celebrated the fact that Polynesia now belonged to France; this was the first celebration of the Tiurai (national and popular festival). In 1890, Papeete became a commune of the Republic of France.
Huahine casts a spell over you from the moment you arrive. Only a 40-minute flight from the island of Tahiti, the enchanted Huahine, with its lush forests, untamed landscape and quaint villages, is one of Tahiti’s best-kept secrets, a place where you can live like a local. A deep, crystal-clear lagoon surrounds the two islands that comprise Huahine, while magnificent bays and white-sand beaches add drama to the experience. Relatively unchanged by the modern world, Huahine offers the slower, more tranquil pace of old Polynesia. With only eight small villages scattered across the island, the few residents welcome visitors with great kindness. Not surprisingly, this fertile world offers a rich soil providing the local farmers a bountiful harvest of vanilla, melons and bananas.
Also commonly referred to as the “secret island,” the “authentic island” and the “secluded island,” many charming adjectives come to mind when mentioning Huahine, and for obvious reasons. The island is a delicious cocktail of Polynesian sceneries and ambiance. Find natural beauty, experience intense encounters with the population, explore the infinite possibilities for adventure and relaxation, alike. Huahine is an island “to live,” an island “to feel.” The famous local singer and painter Bobby Holcomb has chosen this small piece of land where joy and smiles are always around.
The indigenous Tahitians are of Polynesian ancestry comprising 70% of the population alongside Europeans, East Asians (mostly Chinese) and people of mixed heritage sometimes referred to as Demis. They make up the largest population in French Polynesia. Most people from metropolitan France live in Papeete and its suburbs, notably Punaauia where they make up almost 20% of the population.[citation needed]
The hotel has 5 restaurants and bars, plus a long list of activities and excursions, so there will be no shortage of things to do for those who are inspired. On the other hand, its location makes it difficult to reach businesses on Bora Bora itself, so it's probably best suited to the honeymoon crowd rather than those who prefer to explore the whole island.

Four Seasons Resort Bora Bora charges no additional fee for children 17 years of age and younger occupying the same guest room as their parents or guardians (space permitting). Special rates may be available for two adults and two children 17 years of age and younger occupying two rooms, subject to availability. Guests aged 12 and under are considered children. Guests aged 13 to 17 are considered young adults. Guests aged 18 or older are considered adults. A third adult (18 years of age or older) staying in the same room with two other adults, regardless of maximum occupancy, will be charged an additional fee per night, plus applicable taxes, service charges and fees. City tax on guest rooms applies to children aged 12 and older (children under the age of 12 are exempt from the city tax). For reservations and information, please contact the Hotel directly.
Beautiful white sand beaches lie in the districts of Fare and Parea. Go on a lagoon ride on the unreal colored lagoon, explore the underwater world (reef walls, fishy caves and coral gardens) and one of the largest archeological areas of The Islands of Tahiti, enjoy a sunset cruise, deep-sea fishing, surfing, hiking, horseback riding, trekking and kite boarding. Water and land activities abound around the island.

When, on 7 December 1821, Pōmare II died, his son Pōmare III was only eighteen months old. His uncle and the religious people therefore supported the regency, until 2 May 1824, the date on which the missionaries conducted his coronation, a ceremony unprecedented in Tahiti. Taking advantage of the weakness of the Pōmare, local chiefs won back some of their power and took the hereditary title of Tavana (from the English word 'governor'). The missionaries also took advantage of the situation to change the way in which powers were arranged, and to make the Tahitian monarchy closer to the English model of a constitutional monarchy. They therefore created the Tahitian Legislative Assembly, which first sat on 23 February 1824.


Feeling creative? Journey through the expressive side of Huahine life and discover the fine artistry of Melanie Shook Dupre. Inspired by the surrounding lush Polynesian landscapes and lifestyles for over 39 years, Melanie gracefully captivates island life through her paintings and portraits. A true visual charm, "Galerie 'Umatatea", located in Maeva, Huahine is a must see. 
The Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort & Spa is a 5-star resort hotel that offers stunning views of Bora Bora and its lagoon. It's located on a small islet that is a fast & free 5-minute boat ride to the main island, making it perhaps the best of both worlds, with privacy and seclusion, but also with the ability to get elsewhere on Bora Bora quickly if needed.
Generally speaking, the natives appreciate a quiet lifestyle; but Huahine is still a very active island. The main town of Fare springs to life on Sunday mornings when the outdoor market brings truckloads of fruit and produce to the waterfront. Every year in October, the Hawaiki Nui Va'a, the largest outrigger canoe race in the South Pacific, starts from the island of Huahine. On that special day, the air is filled with excitement and intense electricity.
The commune of Bora-Bora is made up of the island of Bora Bora proper with its surrounding islets emerging from the coral reef, 29.3 km2 (11.3 sq mi) in total. The surrounding islets include Motu Tapu, Motu Ahuna, Tevairoa, Motu Tane, Motu Mute, Motu Tufari, Motu Tehotu, Motu Pitiaau, Sofitel Motu, Motu Toopua, and Toopuaiti. The commune also includes the Tūpai atoll. (11 km2 or 4.2 sq mi), located 20 kilometres (12 mi) north of Bora Bora. The atoll of Tūpai has no permanent population apart from about 50 workers in the coconut plantations.
Followers of 'Oro were called ariori, and each district in Tahiti had an ariori lodge led by the avae parae, black leg. These leaders had legs tattooed from thigh to heel. The first 'Oro lodge was established around 1720 by Mahi, a representative of the high priest of Taputapuatea marae and Tamatoa I, the high chief of Ra'iatea. The first 'Oro marae was established at Tautira.[11]
I must say….That Tahiti Nui Travel certainly took great care of me !!!! Everything they did for me……was most definitely…..”TOP NOTCH” !!!! I believe I mentioned how the Heiva seats were excellent as well !!! …..Plus, the Friday night buffet dinner…..didn’t end until probably 10.00pm……So, I was thrilled, when the waitress spoke to the buffet manager, and he took it upon himself to contact Tahiti Nui Travel to ask them to delay picking me up to take me to the airport a half hour, so that I could watch most of the Coco Hotahota’s group performance !!! How extraordinarily thoughtful, attentive, and professional !!! A perfect way to end my South Pacific journey !!!
Huahine measures 16 km (10 mi) in length, with a maximum width of 13 km (8 mi). It is made up of two main islands surrounded by a fringing coral reef with several islets, or motu. Huahine Nui (Big Huahine) lies to the north and Huahine Iti (Little Huahine) to the south. The two islands are separated by a few hundred yards of water and joined by a sandspit at low tide. A small bridge was built to connect Huahine Nui and Huahine Iti.
The ʻōteʻa is one of the few dances which existed in pre-European times as a male dance. On the other hand, the hura (Tahitian vernacular for hula), a dance for women, has disappeared, and the couple's dance 'upa'upa is likewise gone but may have re-emerged as the tamure. Nowadays, the ʻōteʻa can be danced by men (ʻōteʻa tāne), by women (ʻōteʻa vahine), or by both genders (ʻōteʻa ʻāmui = united ʻō.). The dance is with music only, drums, but no singing. The drum can be one of the types of the tōʻere, a laying log of wood with a longitudinal slit, which is struck by one or two sticks. Or it can be the pahu, the ancient Tahitian standing drum covered with a shark skin and struck by the hands or with sticks. The rhythm from the tōʻere is fast, from the pahu it is slower. A smaller drum, the faʻatete, can be used.

In about 1810, Pōmare II married Teremo'emo'e daughter of the chief of Raiatea, to ally himself with the chiefdoms of the Leeward Islands. On 12 November 1815, thanks to these alliances, Pōmare II won a decisive battle at Fe'i Pī (Punaauia), notably against Opuhara,[28] the chief of the powerful clan of Teva.[10] This victory allowed Pōmare II to be styled Ari'i Rahi, or the king of Tahiti. It was the first time that Tahiti had been united under the control of a single family. It was the end of Tahitian feudalism and the military aristocracy, which were replaced by an absolute monarchy. At the same time, Protestantism quickly spread, thanks to the support of Pōmare II, and replaced the traditional beliefs. In 1816 the London Missionary Society sent John Williams as a missionary and teacher, and starting in 1817, the Gospels were translated into Tahitian (Reo Maohi) and taught in the religious schools. In 1818, the minister William Pascoe Crook founded the city of Papeete, which became the capital of the island.
The first European to have visited Tahiti according to existing records was lieutenant Samuel Wallis, who was circumnavigating the globe in HMS Dolphin,[16] sighting the island on 18 June 1767,[17] and eventually harbouring in Matavai Bay. This bay was situated on the territory of the chiefdom of Pare-Arue, governed by Tu (Tu-nui-e-a'a-i-te-Atua) and his regent Tutaha, and the chiefdom of Ha'apape, governed by Amo and his wife "Oberea" (Purea). Wallis named the island King George's Island. The first contacts were difficult, since on the 24 and 26 June 1767,[18] Tahitian warriors in canoes showed aggression towards the British, hurling stones from their slings. In retaliation, the British sailors opened fire on the warriors in the canoes and on the hills. In reaction to this powerful counter-attack, the Tahitians laid down peace offerings for the British.[18] Following this episode, Samuel Wallis was able to establish cordial relations with the female chieftain "Oberea " (Purea) and remained on the island until 27 July 1767.[11]:45–84,104,135
"Tahiti" is a common name for French Polynesia, a country consisting of the 118 islands in the South Pacific. It's also a name of the island with this group. Bora Bora, Tahiti and Moorea are the most popular islands in French Polynesia, yet every island offers a multitude of possibilities: a dive in Rangiroa, a hike in Moorea, an encounter with manta rays in Bora Bora, a swim in Tahiti's waterfalls or a chance to enjoy Polynesian culture in Raiatea ...
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