A clan was composed of a chief (ari'i rahi), nobles (ari'i) and under-chiefs ( 'Īato'ai). The ari'i, considered descendants of the Polynesian gods, were full of mana (spiritual power). They traditionally wore belts of red feathers, symbols of their power. The chief of the clan did not have absolute power. Councils or general assemblies had to be called composed of the ari'i and the 'Īato'ai, especially in case of war.[9]

Maeva, North-East of Fare, is located close to the largest of the two lagoons, called Fa’una Nui. It is famous for its farming activities. Stonefish traps – an ancestral legacy that’s still used – along with numerous marae and other archeological remnants are concentrated around this authentic village. A small educational museum was set up under a fare pōte’e (a house where the local knowledge, sacred traditions and rituals were taught) to exhibit objects and other remnants found during the various archeological digs (paddles, axe blades, fish teeth pendants, pestles, tattoo combs….). In Faie, get close to the huge blue eyed eels.
The location is extremely secluded, at the southern tip of a narrow motu (small islet) off the main island of Bora Bora, so this resort might be ideal for honeymooners and those on a romantic getaway. There is plenty to do on site, but getting to the main island is not especially fast or easy. Le Meridien Bora Bora overwater bungalows have also gone up in price in recent years, but discounts are available when they have enough availability so it's worth checking.
Famously known around world and offering a unique experience, the overwater bungalows made of wood and pandanus with high-end standards provide the best Bora Bora experience you can dream of. Imagine yourself waking up over the crystal clear blue lagoon, jumping from your deck itoto the water or admiring the fish through the glass floor. Each island and resort has their own specific bungalows - from intimate ones to luxury villas with plunge pool.  
Tahiti (/təˈhiːti/; French pronunciation: ​[ta.iti]; previously also known as Otaheite (obsolete)) is the largest island in the Windward group of French Polynesia. The island is located in the archipelago of the Society Islands in the central Southern Pacific Ocean, and is divided into two parts: the bigger, northwestern part, Tahiti Nui, and the smaller, southeastern part, Tahiti Iti. The island was formed from volcanic activity and is high and mountainous with surrounding coral reefs. The population is 189,517 inhabitants (2017 census),[1] making it the most populous island of French Polynesia and accounting for 68.7% of its total population.
In 1836, the Queen's advisor Pritchard had two French Catholic priests expelled, François Caret and Honoré Laval. As a result, in 1838 France sent Admiral Abel Aubert Dupetit-Thouars to get reparation. Once his mission had been completed, Admiral Du Petit-Thouars sailed towards the Marquesas Islands, which he annexed in 1842. Also in 1842, a European crisis involving Morocco escalated between France and Great Britain, souring their relations. In August 1842, Admiral Du Petit-Thouars returned and landed in Tahiti. He then made friends with Tahitian chiefs who were hostile to the Pōmare family and favourable to a French protectorate. He had them sign a request for protection in the absence of their Queen, before then approaching her and obliging her to ratify the terms of the treaty of protectorate. The treaty had not even been ratified by France itself when Jacques-Antoine Moerenhout was named royal commissaire alongside Queen Pōmare.
Huahine feels like one island, but in fact it's two, connected by a short bridge. Huahine Nui (Big Huahine), to the north, is home to the bustling little village of Fare and most of the main tourist and administrative facilities. Rugged and isolated Huahine Iti (Little Huahine), to the south, offers the islands’ best beaches, azure lagoons and a serene, get-away-from-it-all atmosphere.
The Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort & Spa is a 5-star resort hotel that offers stunning views of Bora Bora and its lagoon. It's located on a small islet that is a fast & free 5-minute boat ride to the main island, making it perhaps the best of both worlds, with privacy and seclusion, but also with the ability to get elsewhere on Bora Bora quickly if needed.
Archaeology enthusiast or not, book a tour with Paul Atallah from Island Eco Tours and enjoy an educational and insightful discovery of Polynesia's past. Just outside Maeve Village you will find the largest stone temple with hundreds of excavated structures and many more still uncovered. In the nearby Lake Fauna Nui, visit the ancient stone fish traps considered so sacred that only descendants of the Tahitian royal family can remove them. Lastly, climb Matairea Hill and encounter remnants of countless religious and ceremonial monuments. You can also watch a feeding of the sacred blue-eyed eels in a freshwater lake near the town of Faie.
Located on the northern coast of Bora Bora sits five overwater bungalows, with four of them available for public booking. Three of these bungalows, titled Brando's Overwater Bungalow, Marlon's Over Water Hidaway and The Black Pearl, are all owned by the same couple, making it easy to book more than one at a time if you're interested. The fourth bungalow is owned by a different couple. All of them, however, are kid friendly, which helps to attract more families to the island.

At Four Seasons, a guaranteed reservation assures you of a room even if you check in late (after 6:00 pm). If a room is not available, we will arrange your accommodation in another hotel at our expense, and provide transportation to and from Four Seasons as reasonable. All reservations made through the website must be guaranteed by a major credit card. Certain arrival dates and rates may require a deposit. Specialty suites are subject to a charge of 50% deposit required upon reservation. Please check for full deposit requirements at time of booking.


Portuguese navigator Pedro Fernandes de Queirós, serving the Spanish Crown in an expedition to Terra Australis, was perhaps the first European to set eyes on the island of Tahiti. He sighted an inhabited island on 10 February 1606[12] which he called Sagitaria (or Sagittaria). However, whether the island that he saw was actually Tahiti or not has not been fully ascertained. It has been suggested that he actually saw the island of Rekareka to the south-east of Tahiti.[13] According to other authors the first European to arrive in Tahiti was Spanish explorer Juan Fernández in his expedition of 1576–1577.[14]
In July 1768, Captain James Cook was commissioned by the Royal Society and on orders from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to observe the transit of Venus across the sun, a phenomenon that would be visible from Tahiti on 3 June 1769.[21] He arrived in Tahiti's Matavai Bay, commanding HMS Endeavour on 12 April 1769.[22][11]:141 On 14 April, Cook met with Tutaha and Tepau.[11]:144 On 15 April, Cook picked the site for a fortified camp at Point Venus along with Banks, Parkinson, Daniel Solander, to protect Charles Green's observatory.[11]:147 The length of stay enabled them to undertake for the first time real ethnographic and scientific observations of the island. Assisted by the botanist Joseph Banks, and by the artist Sydney Parkinson, Cook gathered valuable information on the fauna and flora, as well as the native society, language and customs, including the proper name of the island, 'Otaheite'. On 28 April, Cook met Purea and Tupaia, and Tupaia befriended Banks following the transit. On 21 June, Amo visited Cook, and then on 25 June, Pohuetea visited, signifying another chief seeking to ally himself with the British.[11]:154–155,175,183–185
In 1819, Pōmare II, encouraged by the missionaries, introduced the first Tahitian legal code, known under the name of the Pōmare Legal Code,[9] which consists of nineteen laws. The missionaries and Pōmare II thus imposed a ban on nudity (obliging them to wear clothes covering their whole body), banned dances and chants, described as immodest, tattoos and costumes made of flowers.

The wonderful thing about Bora Bora is that you can be as active or inactive as you wish to be. Should you decide to venture away from the resort, you can visit the main village of Vaitape and shop at the local boutiques or dine at one of Bora Bora's restaurants including Mai Kai Bora Bora, or the legendary Bloody Mary's. You can also explore Mount Pahia and Mount Otemanu on a guided hike or Jeep Safari tour.
The location is extremely secluded, at the southern tip of a narrow motu (small islet) off the main island of Bora Bora, so this resort might be ideal for honeymooners and those on a romantic getaway. There is plenty to do on site, but getting to the main island is not especially fast or easy. Le Meridien Bora Bora overwater bungalows have also gone up in price in recent years, but discounts are available when they have enough availability so it's worth checking.
The island's economy is driven almost solely by tourism. Several resorts have been built on motu (small islands, from Tahitian) surrounding the lagoon. Hotel Bora Bora opened in 1961, and nine years later built the first over-the-water bungalows on stilts over the lagoon.[10] Today, over-water bungalows are a standard feature of most Bora Bora resorts. The quality of those bungalows ranges from comparably cheap, basic accommodations to very luxurious and expensive.
Generally speaking, the natives appreciate a quiet lifestyle; but Huahine is still a very active island. The main town of Fare springs to life on Sunday mornings when the outdoor market brings truckloads of fruit and produce to the waterfront. Every year in October, the Hawaiki Nui Va'a, the largest outrigger canoe race in the South Pacific, starts from the island of Huahine. On that special day, the air is filled with excitement and intense electricity.
The first years proved hard work for the missionaries, despite their association with the Pōmare, the importance of whom they were aware of thanks to the reports of earlier sailors. In 1803, upon the death of Pōmare I, his son Vaira'atoa succeeded him and took the title of Pomare II. He allied himself more and more with the missionaries, and from 1803 they taught him reading and the Gospels. Furthermore, the missionaries encouraged his wish to conquer his opponents, so that they would only have to deal with a single political contact, enabling them to develop Christianity in a unified country.[9] The conversion of Pōmare II to Protestantism in 1812 marks moreover the point when Protestantism truly took off on the island.
On 2 April 1768,[19] it was the turn of Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, aboard Boudeuse and Etoile on the first French circumnavigation, to sight Tahiti. On 5 April, he anchored off Hitiaa O Te Ra, and was welcomed by its chief Reti. Bougainville was also visited by Tutaha. Bougainville only stayed about ten days on the island, which he called "Nouvelle-Cythère ", or "New Cythera (the island of Aphrodite)", because of the warm welcome he had received, the sweetness of the Tahitian customs, calling it a "sailor's Paradise." Ahutoru accompanied the French on the return voyage, becoming the first Tahitian to sail on a European vessel.[11]:93–109 The account Bougainville and Philibert Commerson gave of his port of call would contribute to the creation of the myth of a Polynesian paradise and nourished the theme of the noble savage, so dear to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which was very much in fashion.[11]:116–118 Between this date right until the end of the 18th century, the name of the island was spelled phonetically "Taïti". Beginning in the 19th century, the Tahitian orthography "Tahiti" became normal usage in French and English.[20]

On 2 April 1768,[19] it was the turn of Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, aboard Boudeuse and Etoile on the first French circumnavigation, to sight Tahiti. On 5 April, he anchored off Hitiaa O Te Ra, and was welcomed by its chief Reti. Bougainville was also visited by Tutaha. Bougainville only stayed about ten days on the island, which he called "Nouvelle-Cythère ", or "New Cythera (the island of Aphrodite)", because of the warm welcome he had received, the sweetness of the Tahitian customs, calling it a "sailor's Paradise." Ahutoru accompanied the French on the return voyage, becoming the first Tahitian to sail on a European vessel.[11]:93–109 The account Bougainville and Philibert Commerson gave of his port of call would contribute to the creation of the myth of a Polynesian paradise and nourished the theme of the noble savage, so dear to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which was very much in fashion.[11]:116–118 Between this date right until the end of the 18th century, the name of the island was spelled phonetically "Taïti". Beginning in the 19th century, the Tahitian orthography "Tahiti" became normal usage in French and English.[20]
During the First World War, the Papeete region of the island was attacked by two German warships. A French gunboat as well as a captured German freighter were sunk in the harbour and the two German armoured cruisers bombarded the colony. Between 1966 and 1996 the French Government conducted 193 nuclear bomb tests above and below the atolls of Moruroa and Fangataufa. The last test was conducted on 27 January 1996.[35]
When, on 7 December 1821, Pōmare II died, his son Pōmare III was only eighteen months old. His uncle and the religious people therefore supported the regency, until 2 May 1824, the date on which the missionaries conducted his coronation, a ceremony unprecedented in Tahiti. Taking advantage of the weakness of the Pōmare, local chiefs won back some of their power and took the hereditary title of Tavana (from the English word 'governor'). The missionaries also took advantage of the situation to change the way in which powers were arranged, and to make the Tahitian monarchy closer to the English model of a constitutional monarchy. They therefore created the Tahitian Legislative Assembly, which first sat on 23 February 1824.
The first Tahitians arrived from Western Polynesia in about 200 AD,[6] after a long migration from South East Asia or Indonesia, via the Fijian, Samoan and Tongan Archipelagos. This hypothesis of an emigration from Southeast Asia is supported by a number of linguistic, biological and archaeological proofs. For example, the languages of Fiji and Polynesia all belong to the same Oceanic sub-group, Fijian-Polynesian, which itself forms part of the great family of the Austronesian Languages.

Nestled in a lush tropical paradise surrounded by crystal clear lagoon, and overlooking the iconic Mount Otemanu, Le Méridien Bora Bora sets the perfect atmosphere for a romantic idyll or peaceful getaway. Unlock one of French Polynesia’s most engaging destination blessed with natural beauty. The resort offers a unique experience in each of its 98 bungalows or suites decorated in a chic and modern Polynesian-style. Awaken in one of our Overwater Bungalows offering the largest glass panel floors, relax in our Beach Bungalows located alongside the inner private lagoon or retreat in a Beach Villa with a private plunge pool. Stimulate your curious palate and taste a delightful range of cuisine with a choice of three unique outlets, the Tipanie, the Te Ava and the Hapaina Wine & Tapas Bar. Time can be spent on the expansive white sandy beach for sunbathing or enjoying water sport, at the Manahau Wellness Center or at the Turtle Sanctuary, our Ecological Center dedicated to marine life.
The Tahitians believed in the afterlife, a paradise called Rohutu-no'ano'a. When a Tahitian died, the barkcloth wrapped corpse was placed on a funeral bier, fare tupapa 'u, which was a raised canoe awning on posts surrounded by bamboo. Food for the gods was placed nearby to prevent them from eating the body, which would condemn the spirit to the underworld. Mourners would slash themselves with shark's teeth and the blood smeared on barkcloth placed nearby. Most importantly, the Chief Mourner, donned the parae, an elaborate costume composed of an iridescent mask made of four polished pearl shell discs. One disk was black signifying Po, the spirit world, while one was white, signifying Ao, the world of people. A crown of red feathers signified 'Oro. A curved wooden board, pautu, below the mask contained five polished pearl shells, which signified Hina, the moon goddess. Hanging below were more shells in rows, ahu-parau, signifying the Pleiades, considered to be the eyes of former chiefs. Finally, a ceremonial garment, tiputa, covered the body and was decorated with an apron of polished coconut shells, ahu-'aipu.[11]:151-152,177-179,308
In a surprise result, Oscar Temaru's pro-independence progressive coalition, Union for Democracy, formed a government with a one-seat majority in the 57-seat parliament, defeating the conservative party, Tahoera'a Huiraatira, led by Gaston Flosse. On 8 October 2004, Flosse succeeded in passing a censure motion against the government, provoking a crisis. A controversy is whether the national government of France should use its power to call for new elections in a local government in case of a political crisis.
Part of the Leeward Group of Society Islands, Huahine is a 40-minute flight from Tahiti and rests in close proximity to Raiatea, Taha'a and Bora Bora. The island is divided into two parts: Huahine Nui (big) and Huahine Iti (small). The name Huahine, a variation of the Tahitian word vahine (woman), presumably refers to a mountain ridge resembling the outline of a pregnant woman—a symbol of the island's irrefutable fertility.
This natural abundance blends seamlessly with a wealth of ancient history and mythical intrigue. Once the home of Tahitian royalty, Huahine is considered the cradle of Polynesian culture. The island maintains the largest concentration of ancient marae (temples) in French Polynesia, some of which are believed to date back to the original ancestors of the Tahitians—the Lapita people—around 700 AD.
Feeling creative? Journey through the expressive side of Huahine life and discover the fine artistry of Melanie Shook Dupre. Inspired by the surrounding lush Polynesian landscapes and lifestyles for over 39 years, Melanie gracefully captivates island life through her paintings and portraits. A true visual charm, "Galerie 'Umatatea", located in Maeva, Huahine is a must see. 
In 1843, the Queen's Protestant advisor, Pritchard, persuaded her to display the Tahitian flag in place of the flag of the Protectorate.[33] By way of reprisal, Admiral Dupetit-Thouars announced the annexation of the Kingdom of Pōmare on 6 November 1843 and set up the governor Armand Joseph Bruat there as the chief of the new colony. He threw Pritchard into prison, and later sent him back to Britain. The annexation caused the Queen to be exiled to the Leeward Islands, and after a period of troubles, a real Franco-Tahitian war began in March 1844. News of Tahiti reached Europe in early 1844. The French statesman François Guizot, supported by King Louis-Philippe of France, had denounced annexation of the island.
This emigration, across several hundred kilometres of ocean, was made possible by using outrigger canoes that were up to twenty or thirty meters long and could transport families as well as domestic animals. In 1769, for instance, James Cook mentions a great traditional ship (va'a) in Tahiti that was 33 m (108 ft) long, and could be propelled by sail or paddles.[7] In 2010, an expedition on a simple outrigger canoe with a sail retraced the route back from Tahiti to Asia.[8]
A trip to Bora Bora and Tahiti is your ticket to discover a new and colorful world. Lush green mountains, crystal clear lagoons and romantic overwater bungalows are awaiting you in this idyllic part of the world. Just looking at the images of Bora Bora makes you want to leave everything behind and fully immerse in this world of beauty and tranquility. It's no surprise Tahiti is a bucket list destination for many people, and a honeymoon in Bora Bora is the dream of many brides and grooms.
The island is 45 km (28 mi) across at its widest point and covers an area of 1,045 km2 (403 sq mi). The highest peak is Mont Orohena (Mou'a 'Orohena) (2,241 m (7,352 ft)). Mount Roonui, or Mount Ronui (Mou'a Rōnui), in the southeast rises to 1,332 m (4,370 ft). The island consists of two roughly round portions centred on volcanic mountains and connected by a short isthmus named after the small town of Taravao which is situated there.[citation needed]
Huahine measures 16 km (10 mi) in length, with a maximum width of 13 km (8 mi). It is made up of two main islands surrounded by a fringing coral reef with several islets, or motu. Huahine Nui (Big Huahine) lies to the north and Huahine Iti (Little Huahine) to the south. The two islands are separated by a few hundred yards of water and joined by a sandspit at low tide. A small bridge was built to connect Huahine Nui and Huahine Iti.
Bora Bora is arguably one of the world's most beautiful islands, showcasing white-sand beaches, impossibly clear seas and lush terrain covered in fragrant hibiscus trees and swaying palms. From honeymooners to families, The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort offers travelers to French Polynesia easy access to the island's best attractions, including unique recreational activities, delicious dining and nearby shopping venues.
The island is 45 km (28 mi) across at its widest point and covers an area of 1,045 km2 (403 sq mi). The highest peak is Mont Orohena (Mou'a 'Orohena) (2,241 m (7,352 ft)). Mount Roonui, or Mount Ronui (Mou'a Rōnui), in the southeast rises to 1,332 m (4,370 ft). The island consists of two roughly round portions centred on volcanic mountains and connected by a short isthmus named after the small town of Taravao which is situated there.[citation needed]
Pautu and Tetuanui returned to Tahiti with Bonechea aboard Aguila on 14 November 1774, Tipitipia and Heiao having passed away in the interim. Bonechea died on 26 January 1775 in Tahiti, and was buried near the Spanish mission at Tautira Bay. Lt. Tomas Gayangos took over command. Gayangos set sail for Peru on 27 Jan, leaving the two friars, Father Geronimo Clota and Father Narciso Gonzalez, and Maximo Rodriguez and Francisco Perez, in charge of the Spanish mission. However, the Spanish mission on Tahiti was abandoned on 12 November 1775, after Aguila's third voyage to Tahiti, when the Fathers begged its commander, Don Cayetano de Langara, to take them back to Lima.[25] Some maps still bear the name Isla de Amat for Tahiti, named after Viceroy Amat who ordered the expedition.[26] A most notable result of these voyages was the journal by a marine in the Spanish Navy named Maximo Rodriguez, which contains valuable information about the Tahitians of the 18th century, augmented with the accounts by the Chilean Don Jose de Andia y Varela.[11]:321,323,340,351–357,361,381–383

The inevitable love affair with this island begins right before you touch down. The view from the plane window is a moment you will not soon forget. Have your camera in hand as you begin your descent and prepare for the moment when iconic Mount Otemanu comes into view. From that point on, each experience will only continue to exceed even your highest expectations.
Overwater bungalows were first invented in the South Pacific (in Moorea, off Tahiti, to be specific), and this is still the premiere destination for overwater resorts. But if you aren't close to the South Pacific then you should probably also consider the Maldives. Water villas in the Maldives, as they are called there, can be found at over 80 different resorts. This string of islands just south of India has most of the world's water bungalows, and as a result they also have the most competition and the best value.
The commune of Bora-Bora is made up of the island of Bora Bora proper with its surrounding islets emerging from the coral reef, 29.3 km2 (11.3 sq mi) in total. The surrounding islets include Motu Tapu, Motu Ahuna, Tevairoa, Motu Tane, Motu Mute, Motu Tufari, Motu Tehotu, Motu Pitiaau, Sofitel Motu, Motu Toopua, and Toopuaiti. The commune also includes the Tūpai atoll. (11 km2 or 4.2 sq mi), located 20 kilometres (12 mi) north of Bora Bora. The atoll of Tūpai has no permanent population apart from about 50 workers in the coconut plantations.
Bora Bora may feel worlds away, but this South Seas splendor is well within reach. Where is Bora Bora, exactly? The island lies just northwest of Tahiti, less than an hour away by plane from Papeete. The airport is located on a small, separate part of the island known as Motu Mete. Upon arrival, you will be greeted with a warm smile and fragrant flower lei and transferred by boat to your Bora Bora resort, meaning you hardly have to wait for your first encounter with the island's famously translucent lagoon.
Followers of 'Oro were called ariori, and each district in Tahiti had an ariori lodge led by the avae parae, black leg. These leaders had legs tattooed from thigh to heel. The first 'Oro lodge was established around 1720 by Mahi, a representative of the high priest of Taputapuatea marae and Tamatoa I, the high chief of Ra'iatea. The first 'Oro marae was established at Tautira.[11]

Although various explorers had refused to get involved in tribal conflicts, the mutineers from Bounty offered their services as mercenaries and furnished arms to the family which became the Pōmare Dynasty. The chief Tū knew how to use their presence in the harbours favoured by sailors to his advantage. As a result of his alliance with the mutineers, he succeeded in considerably increasing his supremacy over the island of Tahiti.
Tahitian cultures included an oral tradition that involved the mythology of gods, such as 'Oro and beliefs, as well as ancient traditions such as tattooing and navigation. The annual Heivā Festival in July is a celebration of traditional culture, dance, music and sports including a long distance race between the islands of French Polynesia, in modern outrigger canoes (va'a).
The war ended in December 1846 in favour of the French. The Queen returned from exile in 1847 and agreed to sign a new covenant, considerably reducing her powers, while increasing those of the commissaire. The French nevertheless still reigned over the Kingdom of Tahiti as masters. In 1863, they put an end to the British influence and replaced the British Protestant Missions with the Société des missions évangéliques de Paris (Society of Evangelical Missions of Paris).
The first Tahitians arrived from Western Polynesia in about 200 AD,[6] after a long migration from South East Asia or Indonesia, via the Fijian, Samoan and Tongan Archipelagos. This hypothesis of an emigration from Southeast Asia is supported by a number of linguistic, biological and archaeological proofs. For example, the languages of Fiji and Polynesia all belong to the same Oceanic sub-group, Fijian-Polynesian, which itself forms part of the great family of the Austronesian Languages.
Each district or clan was organised around their marae, or stone temple. Anne Salmond quotes John Orsmond, an early missionary, as stating, "Marae were the sanctity and glory of the land, they were the pride of the people of these islands." This was especially true for the ancestral and national marae associated with the royal line. "It was the basis of royalty; It awakened the gods; It fixed the red feather girdle of the high chiefs."[11]:23,26–27
Huahine is immaculately tropical and effortlessly Polynesian. Lush and scarcely developed, this is an island to visit for extreme calm, communing with nature and a genuine taste of culture. There are plenty of opportunities for diving, surfing, snorkelling, exploring top-notch archaeological sites and horse riding, but the beauty of this place is just how easy it is to relax and do very little at all. The days go by, your skin gets a little darker and your smile a little wider.
In July 1768, Captain James Cook was commissioned by the Royal Society and on orders from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to observe the transit of Venus across the sun, a phenomenon that would be visible from Tahiti on 3 June 1769.[21] He arrived in Tahiti's Matavai Bay, commanding HMS Endeavour on 12 April 1769.[22][11]:141 On 14 April, Cook met with Tutaha and Tepau.[11]:144 On 15 April, Cook picked the site for a fortified camp at Point Venus along with Banks, Parkinson, Daniel Solander, to protect Charles Green's observatory.[11]:147 The length of stay enabled them to undertake for the first time real ethnographic and scientific observations of the island. Assisted by the botanist Joseph Banks, and by the artist Sydney Parkinson, Cook gathered valuable information on the fauna and flora, as well as the native society, language and customs, including the proper name of the island, 'Otaheite'. On 28 April, Cook met Purea and Tupaia, and Tupaia befriended Banks following the transit. On 21 June, Amo visited Cook, and then on 25 June, Pohuetea visited, signifying another chief seeking to ally himself with the British.[11]:154–155,175,183–185
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